GROUP SHOWS 

Darío Escobar at Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University

Darío Escobar is a part of the exhibition 'Cultures of the Sea: Art of the Ancient Americas' at Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University with his work 'Sin título (tabla de surf) [Untitled (Surfboard)]' (2001).

The exhibition runs through 2020 (360 Tour Available).

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

For more information please click here
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'For ancient cultures on the Central and South American coasts, the ocean was both a source of livelihood and a way of life: It provided food, precious materials and divine inspiration in regions with often-severe environmental conditions. Cultures of the Sea: Art of the Ancient Americas brings together works of art from 100 BCE to the present that illustrate how the ocean shaped the cultural legacies of these civilizations. This exhibition features ceramics, textiles and carvings, many on view for the first time, from the Nasher Museum’s permanent collection.' - Nasher Museum of Art.

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Work details:

Dario Escobar
Sin título (tabla de surf) [Untitled (Surfboard)], 2001
Polyurethane, plastic, tin, and silver
191 x 48 x 10 cm (75,2 x 18,9 x 3,94 in)


Collection Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, North Carolina.

 

Photo credit: Peter Paul Geoffrion

 

Photo credit: Studio Darío Escobar

Photo credit: Peter Paul Geoffrion

GROUP SHOWS 

Darío Escobar at Museo Jumex

Darío Escobar is a part of the exhibition 'Colección Jumex: On the Razor’s Edge' at Museo Jumex in Mexico City with his work 'Transparent Sculpture IV' (2014). ⁠ ⁠

The exhibition will run until 13.02.2021. ⁠ ⁠

For more information please click here

Work Details: ⁠ ⁠

Dario Escobar ⁠
Transparent Sculpture IV, 2014 ⁠
Wood & metal. ⁠
177,88 x 206,4 x 117 cm (70,03 x 81,26 x 46,06 in)

Collection Jumex Museum, Mexico City.

 

 

Photo credit: Studio Dario Escobar 

 

Photo credit: Studio Dario Escobar 

GROUP SHOWS 

Dario Escobar at Phoenix Art Museum

Dario Escobar is a part of the exhibition 'Stories of Abstraction: Contemporary Latin American Art in the Global Context' at Phoenix Art Museum with his work 'Broken Circle VIII' (2013)⁠

The exhibition will open 01.10.2020 and will run until 31.01.2021. ⁠

Location: Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, Arizona⁠

For more information please click here
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'Stories of Abstraction: Contemporary Latin American Art in the Global Context presents rarely seen artworks by some of Latin America’s most innovative contemporary artists to uncover how abstraction can be used to generate new narratives, insightful social commentary, and even political change' - Phoenix Art Museum⁠

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Details:⁠

Dario Escobar ⁠
Broken Circle VIII, 2013⁠
Plastic & Steel.⁠
470 x 220 x 1 cm (185,04 x 86,61 x ,39 in)⁠

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Collection Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix⁠


GROUP SHOWS 

SUPERFLEX is a part of the group exhibition 'Le Cours des Choses' at CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux

'The Working Life' (2013) by SUPERFLEX is a part of the group exhibition 'Le Cours des Choses' at CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux until August 16. 2020. ⁠ ⁠ The exhibition features video work from more than 30 visual artists whose work can be reinterpreted in the light of the current global health crisis. ⁠ ⁠ 'The Working Life' is a 9.50-minute film addressing the work situation from a therapeutic perspective. ⁠

To read more about the work and the exhibition please click here

GROUP SHOWS 

Torbjørn Rødland is a part of the exhibition 'Amuse-bouche. The Taste of Art' at Museum Tinguely, Basel. ⁠

The exhibition will run until 17 May 2020. ⁠

For more information please click here

GROUP SHOWS 

Superflex 'One Two Three Swing!' in Desert X AlUla

One Two Three Swing! is a part of the Desert X AlUla from 31st January until 7th March 2020.

Desert X AlUla is organised collaboratively by Desert X and the Royal Commission of AlUla (RCU), the exhibition takes place in the desert of AlUla, an ancient oasis in Saudi Arabia. It is the first site-reponsive exhibition of its kind in Saudi Arabia. The exhibition is a cross-cultural dialogue between artists from Saudi Arabia and its surrounding region and artists from previous iterations of Desert X in California, taking its cues from the extraordinary landscape and historical significance of AlUla.
 
One Two Three Swing!
To exist in a global economy is to be in constant swing; periods of intense flux are interrupted by moments of sudden paralysis. These movements are causal, and capital connects us all, for better or worse. But perhaps we can harness this movement ourselves. Comprised of several sets of three-seated swings conjoined by a zig-zagging orange support, One Two Three Swing! invites its users to activate the socially transformative potential of collective movement, challenging society’s apathy towards the political, environmental and economic crises of our age. The multi-user swing acts as a human- powered pendulum, converting energy into movement that is almost flight: rocking, moving, propelling backward and forward with increasing momentum in a process of ever shifting equilibrium and play.

The swing’s users must utilize the forces of gravity through coordinated pushings and pullings, until everyone moves into full swing together. In this playful moment, the potential energy of group movement is released. Perhaps it is possible, then, to shift the impact of our collective action to achieve a different kind of global momentum, and utilize the act of swinging together as a means of social and political transformation. First installed at the Tate Modern Turbine Hall in 2017, various site-specific installations of the swing-set continue to be created on a great diversity of contexts, such as AlUla in Saudi Arabia, the DMZ area in South Korea and Vordingborg in Denmark. The color-scheme of the swings themselves represents the specific colors of the national currency of the country in which the swings are installed. Over time, the work will evolve as the orange support continues to grow and new swings are added into the wider world.

For more information please click here